10.1.3 Lesson 8 - UnboundEd

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

10.1.3

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Lesson 8

Introduction In this culminating lesson on “Two Kinds,” students analyze Jing-mei's reflections on the significance of events from her childhood (pp. 142–144). Students work towards a cumulative understanding of how Jing Mei's character develops throughout “Two Kinds” as they connect their analysis of this passage to key details from the chapter as a whole. Working in groups to complete the Expectations and Response Tool, students select key details from throughout the chapter in order to forge connections between Jing-mei’s initial response to her mother’s expectations, and the relationship between these childhood interactions and Jing-mei’s adult sense of self. Students then discuss a series of questions that facilitate a more detailed consideration of the character interactions, point of view, and structural choices in this final excerpt. These questions guide students in their exploration of this lesson’s focusing question: What “kind” of a daughter has Jingmei become? Students address this question in a Quick Write at the end of the lesson. For homework, students revise and expand their notes in preparation for the Mid-Unit Assessment in Lesson 9 and continue with their AIR, with a new focus standard (RL.9-10.6 or RI.9-10.6) to guide their reading.

Standards Assessed Standard(s) RL.9-10.3

Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Addressed Standard(s) W.9-10.2.b

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization and analysis of content. b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

W.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

SL.9-10.1.a, c

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

Assessment Assessment(s) The learning in this lesson is captured through a Quick Write at the end of the lesson. Students answer the following prompt based on the reading (citing text evidence and analyzing key words and phrases) completed in the lesson.  What “kind” of daughter has Jing-mei become? How has she developed over the course of the text? Support your response with evidence from the excerpts on your Expectations and Response Tool, as well as from this lesson’s excerpt (pp. 142–144).  This question encourages students to engage with the assessed standard RL.9-10.3, as they consider how Jing-mei has developed over the course of the text. High Performance Response(s) A High Performance Responses should:  Begin with a claim about the “kind” of daughter Jing-mei has become.  Make a connection between the “kind” of daughter Jing-mei has become as an adult, and the “kind” of daughter she was as a child.  Support this connection with evidence from both the Expectations and Response Tool and the Lesson 8 close reading excerpt.  Conclude with a reflection on this comparison between Jing-mei’s relationship to her mother’s expectations as a child and her relationship to these expectations as an adult.

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Vocabulary Vocabulary to provide directly (will not include extended instruction)  unchecked (adj.) – not restrained or controlled Vocabulary to teach (may include direct word work and/or questions)  inevitable (adj.) – unable to be avoided, evaded or escaped; certain; necessary

Lesson Agenda/Overview Student-Facing Agenda

% of Lesson

Standards & Text:  Standards: RL.9-10.3, W.9-10.2.b, W.9-10.4, SL.9-10.1.a, c  Text: “Two Kinds” (pp. 142–144) Learning Sequence: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Introduction of Lesson Agenda Homework Accountability Masterful Reading Expectations and Response Tool Evidence-Based Discussion Quick Write Closing

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

5% 10% 5% 30% 30% 15% 5%

Materials 

Copies of the Expectations and Response Tool for each student



Student Copies of the 10.1 Common Core Learning Standards Tool (refer to 10.1.1 Lesson 1)



Student Copies of the Short Response Rubric (refer to 10.1.1. Lesson 1)

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Learning Sequence How to Use the Learning Sequence Symbol 10% no symbol

  

Type of Text & Interpretation of the Symbol Percentage indicates the percentage of lesson time each activity should take. Plain text indicates teacher action. Bold text indicates questions for the teacher to ask students. Italicized text indicates a vocabulary word. Indicates student action(s). Indicates possible student response(s) to teacher questions. Indicates instructional notes for the teacher.

Activity 1: Introduction of Lesson Agenda

5%

Begin by introducing the agenda and assessed standard for this lesson: RL.9-10.3. Students work towards a cumulative understanding of how Jing Mei's character develops throughout the story in order to answer the focusing question and end-of-lesson assessment: What “kind” of a daughter has Jing-mei become?  Students follow along.

Activity 2: Homework Accountability

10%

Lead a full-class discussion of student responses to the homework prompt: How does Jing-mei‘s mother transform over the course of this passage? What causes this change? Use evidence from the text to support your response.  Students share their written responses to the homework prompt.

 In the beginning of this passage, Jing-mei describes her mother as “frighteningly strong,” her “chest was heaving” and she was “smiling crazily” (pp. 141–142). By the end of this passage, she has transformed from a strong angry woman to a frail shell of herself. Jing-mei describes her mother as she backs out of the room as “blank” faced, “slack” armed, and “blowing away like a small brown leaf, thin, brittle, lifeless” (p. 142). Students should identify Jing-mei’s final statement “I wish I’d never been born!...I wish I were dead! Like them” as the “magic words” that transform her mother from a strong woman into a lifeless and fragile shell of herself. Some students might suggest that Jing-mei’s statement makes it appear as if she doesn’t understand the sacrifices that her mother has made to give her a better life than the daughters she left

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

behind in China. Others might understand her mother’s transformation as a result of having all of the hopes and dreams she had invested in her “American” daughter destroyed.  If students struggle to make this connection, direct them back to the portion of text in which Jing-

mei first references her mother’s lost daughters. In the third paragraph on page 132, Jing-mei explains, “America was where all my mother’s hopes lay. She had come here in 1949 after losing everything in China…twin baby girls. But she never looked back with regret. There were so many ways for things to get better.”

Activity 3: Masterful Reading

5%

Introduce the Quick Write assessment (What “kind” of daughter has Jing-mei become? How has she developed over the course of the text?). Explain to students that this is the lesson assessment and the focus for today’s reading.  Students read the assessment prompt and listen.  Display the Quick Write assessment prompt for students to see.

Have students listen to a masterful reading of “Two Kinds” from “It was not the only disappointment my mother felt in me” through “I realized they were two halves of the same song” (pp. 142–144). Instruct students to follow along in their texts. Provide the definition for the word unchecked when it appears during the masterful reading.

Activity 4: Expectations and Response Tool

30%

Instruct students to take out their 10.1 Common Core Learning Standards Tool. Review W.9-10.2.b, and answer any clarifying questions. Distribute the Expectations and Response Tool. Inform students that they are practicing the W.9-10.2.b skills of developing analysis with well-chosen, relevant, concrete details, quotations, or other examples through their work with the Expectations and Response Tool. Explain that the Expectations and Response Tool is for connecting key details throughout “Two Kinds” in order to build towards a cumulative understanding of how Jing-mei develops over the course of the text through her interactions with her mother. Students use the Expectations and Response Tool to review and select textual details from previous excerpts of “Two Kinds” (pp. 132–142) in columns 1 and 2, and then make connections

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

between these key details and those in the Lesson 8 close reading excerpt (pp. 142–144) in column 3, in order to build towards cumulative comprehension of “Two Kinds.” Have students form heterogeneous groups. They will remain in these groups for the duration of the lesson. Instruct students to read over the directions on their Expectations and Response Tool in their groups and answer any clarifying questions.

Instruct students to read independently from “It was not the only disappointment my mother felt in me” to “I could be anything I wanted to be. I could only be me” (p. 142), then complete the Expectations and Response Tool in their groups.  See the Model Expectations and Response Tool.  If students struggle to complete the tool, take the time to model a few of the boxes with them. Alternately, modify the tool to include fewer blank boxes for students to complete. Observe group work and offer guidance if needed.

Activity 5: Evidence-Based Discussion

30%

Inform students that they will deepen the character analysis they conducted on their Expectations and Response Tool through a series of discussion questions. Display the following questions for students to discuss in their groups. All students should be prepared to share their collaboratively generated observations with the class. How much time has passed between this excerpt and the last? How do you know? Underline the parts of the text that tell you so.  Many years have passed between this excerpt and the last. Students should underline Jing-mei’s reference to “the years that followed,” as well as her reference to dropping out of college (p. 142). Students should underline Jing-mei’s statement “A few years ago, she offered to give me the piano, for my thirtieth birthday” (p. 143), as a more precise indication of the time that has passed since the piano incident. How does this affect your understanding of Jing-mei’s point of view in this excerpt and in this chapter?  In this excerpt, Jing-mei clearly expresses an adult perspective. Students should connect this observation to a corresponding observation about Jing-mei’s point of view throughout “Two File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Kinds.” Students might suggest that although this chapter is almost entirely about events that occurred in Jing-mei’s childhood, these “events” are memories, or reflections. The voice of the narrator is an adult voice remembering what it was like to be a child.  Differentiation Consideration: Consider asking students to connect this observation to portions of the text that they have already analyzed that reveal Jing-mei’s reflective perspective. For example, Jing-mei remembers that Old Chong “must have been younger than I thought” (p. 136), exposing her childhood memories as potentially biased. What “kind” of daughter has Jing-mei become (p. 142)? Use her mother’s explanation of the “only two kinds of daughters” to frame your response.  Jing-mei has not become the “obedient” daughter her mother desired. Instead she asserts her “own mind” (p. 142). She is the other “kind of daughter,” one of “those who follow their own mind” (p. 142).  Differentiation Consideration: Consider posing the following extension question to enrich students’ understanding of the text: What words or phrases in the last paragraph can help you to understand what Jing-mei means by “failure was inevitable” (p. 142)? What does this suggest about who Jing-mei thinks is responsible for the way her life turned out? Support your response with textual evidence from the Expectations and Response Tool.  Students should derive the meaning of “inevitable” from that final sentence: “so I never found a way to ask her why she had hoped for something so large that failure was inevitable” (p.142). If Jing-mei’s mother’s hopes were unreasonably high, then Jing-mei was bound to fall short of these expectations. Therefore, inevitable means that something is certain to happen. Students should reference Jing-mei’s response to her mother’s expectations on pages 136 and 142 of their Expectations and Response Tool, to explain that her mother’s dreams for her make Jingmei feel as if her mother wants her to be something different than she is.  Differentiation Consideration: If students struggle with this vocabulary question, direct them to the first paragraph of this excerpt. Jing-mei’s detailed list of her many failures clarify her reference to “inevitable” failure later in the excerpt, as this list illustrates that Jing-mei did indeed fail to live up to her mother’s expectations. What does Jing-mei's attitude toward her mother's possessions reveal about her adult feelings for her mother?

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

 Jing-mei appears to treasure her mother’s possessions, even items like the hand knitted sweaters that she used to hate (p. 143). Listen for students to infer that Jing-mei’s respectful attitude towards her mother’s possessions indicates a similar respect for her mother. Some students might point to the Chinese origins of many of these treasured possessions to indicate that Jing-mei has come to find value in her mother’s culture. What might the phrase “or so it seemed” in the first line of the last paragraph reveal about Jing-mei's adult perspective (p. 144)?  Students should infer from the addition of the qualifying phrase “or so it seemed” to Jing-mei’s statement “and for the first time” (p. 144) that she is suggesting that perhaps she had made this realization before. However, as an adult, she understands this realization in a new way, and so it feels like the “first time” (p. 144). The phrase “or so it seemed” reveals that Jing-mei’s adult perspective influences how she understands (and therefore narrates) her childhood memories. What is the relationship between “Pleading Child” and “Perfectly Contented” (p. 144)? What might this realization reveal about Jing-mei’s adult understanding of her childhood?  “Perfectly Contented” and “Pleading Child” are two halves of the same song. Student responses will vary, but may include that Jing-mei’s realization suggests that she understands her childhood “misery” as only one half of her story. The other half of the story is that of a “perfectly contented” adult. Some students might suggest that if these two components each only make up half a song, then both are necessary to complete an entire song. One cannot exist in isolation from the other, and together they complete and complement each other. Perhaps Jing-mei is realizing that her childhood struggles were necessary for her to find the sense of peace she feels as an adult. Circulate and assist as needed. When groups have discussed questions 1–4, lead a brief class recap of student observations.

Instruct students to take out their 10.1 Common Core Learning Standards Tool. Review SL.9-10.1.c and SL.9-10.1.a.  Students first encountered SL.9-10.1.c and SL.9-10.1.a in Lesson 2, but have yet to strategically employ these skills in class discussion. Consider displaying SL.9-10.1.c and SL.9-10.1.a for the duration of the discussion.

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Pose the following question for full-class discussion: What “kind” of daughter has Jing-mei become? Support your response with evidence from the excerpts on your Expectations and Response Tool, as well as from this lesson’s close reading excerpt (pp. 142–144). Remind students that during class discussion they should explicitly draw upon the preparation they have done with their Expectations and Response Tool by referring to direct evidence from the text as they exchange ideas (SL.9-10.1.a).  If students struggle, consider providing the additional support of sentence stems that encourage students to refer to textual evidence in discussion. For example: o

I think that (evidence) supports this connection...because…

o

I think that...based on (evidence).

Throughout the discussion, encourage students to practice the skills outlined in SL.9-10.1.c. Some students may benefit from the display or distribution of sentence stems to guide them in actively incorporating others into the discussion and clarifying, verifying, or challenging ideas and conclusions. For example: 

I agree/disagree with (student) because…



I hear you saying that...I think that…



I hear you saying that...This raises (a question)



I think that (evidence) shows...This supports/challenges your idea that…

Activity 6: Quick Write

15%

Inform students that they will be working on incorporating the skills outlined in W.9-10.4 in their writing throughout the rest of this unit. Direct students to review W.9-10.4 on their Common Core Learning Standards Tool. Allow time to answer any clarifying questions. Display the following two excerpts: Excerpt #1: “Cane sugar can be traced back to the island now called New Guinea, which is just north of Australia. Cane was probably first cultivated by humans on the island some five thousand years or more before the Greeks.” (Aronson Marc and Marina Budhos. Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science, 10).

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Excerpt #2: “It was as if I had said the magic words. Alakazam! – and her face went blank, her mouth closed, her arms went slack, and she backed out of the room, stunned, as if she were blowing away like a small brown leaf, thin, brittle, lifeless” (Tan, Amy. “Two Kinds” The Joy Luck Club, 142) Pose the following questions to guide students through a comparison of these two excerpts: What might the intended task, purpose, or audience be for this piece of writing? How do you know? Students should call upon details from the excerpts to support their understanding.  Students compare the style and tone of the two excerpts to deduce the purpose, task, or audience of each.  Excerpt #1 is intended to educate readers about a topic. This excerpt is written in formal, objective language, and contains facts. The content is informational, and the matter of fact style matches this content.  Excerpt #2 is written in an emotional, narrative style to communicate personal feelings about an emotional experience. Students may support this understanding by pointing to the irregular punctuation of this excerpt, the informal, conversational word “Alakazam!,” or the poetic descriptions. Lead students in a brief conversation about what they think appropriate style, development, and organization is for a Quick Write. Students should consider the purpose and audience of this task.

Instruct students to respond briefly in writing to the following prompt: What “kind” of daughter has Jing-mei become? How has she developed over the course of the text? Support your response with evidence from the excerpts on your Expectations and Response Tool, as well as from this lesson’s close reading excerpt (pp. 142–144). Instruct students to look at their text and notes to find evidence. Remind students to use the Short Response Rubric and Checklist to guide their written response. Instruct students that their writing should reflect an understanding of the purpose and intended audience of this informal writing assignment.  Students listen and read the Quick Write prompt.  Display the prompt for students to see or provide the prompt in hard copy. Transition students to the independent Quick Write.

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

DRAFT

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

 Students independently answer the prompt, using evidence from the text.  See the High Performance Response at the beginning of this lesson.

Activity 7: Closing

5%

Display and distribute the homework assignment. Instruct students to revise and expand their notes in preparation for the Mid-Unit Assessment presentation. Share the presentation prompt with students: How does Tan develop and refine a central idea in “Two Kinds”? Additionally, students should continue to read their AIR text, this time through a new focus standard: RL.9-10.6 or RI.9-10.6. Introduce these standards and model what applying a focus standard looks like. For example, RI.9-10.6 asks students to “determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.” Students who have read an article on importing exotic animals might determine that the author’s intention is to stop the illegal trade of exotic animals. Students should call upon how the author uses rhetoric to persuade readers of their point of view; for example, when the author draws upon statistics like “50 percent of all pet parrots are kept in substandard conditions.” Explain that students should prepare for a 3–5 minute discussion in which they will apply the language of the standards to their reading.

Homework Revise and expand your notes in preparation for the Mid-Unit Assessment. Continue your AIR through the lens of the focus standard RL.9-10.6 or RI.9-10.6.

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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DRAFT

NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Expectations and Response Tool Name:

Class:

Date:

Instructions: Working in your groups, fill in the blank spaces in this table with a quote or key detail from “Two Kinds” that helps you to make connections between Jing-mei’s mother’s expectations (column 1), Jing-mei’s childhood response (column 2), and how these interactions play out in Jing-mei’s adult life (column 3). Hint: Jing-mei’s response and her mother’s expectations can usually be found close together in the text. All evidence in column 3 should come from the Lesson 8 close reading excerpt (pp. 142–144). Mother’s Expectations

Jing-mei’s Response

“My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be … You could become instantly famous” (p. 132).

“So maybe I never really gave myself … the most discordant hymns” (p. 138).

“‘Just like you,’ she said. ‘Not the best. Because you not trying.’ She gave a little huff as she let go of the sound dial and sat down on the sofa” (p. 136).

“He taught me all these things … because I hadn’t practiced enough, I never corrected myself” (p. 137).

“My mother slapped me. ‘Who ask you be genius?’ She shouted. ‘Only ask you be your best. For you sake. You think I want you be genius? Hnnh! What for! Who ask you!’” (p. 136) “‘You want me to be someone that I’m not!’ I sobbed. “I’ll never be the kind of daughter you want me to be!’” (p. 142)

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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“In the years that followed…” (p. 142)

DRAFT

NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum

Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8

Model Expectations and Response Tool Name:

Class:

Date:

Instructions: Working in your groups, fill in the blank spaces in this table with a quote or key detail from “Two Kinds” that helps you to make connections between Jing-mei’s mother’s expectations (column 1), Jing-mei’s childhood response (column 2), and how these interactions play out in Jing-mei’s adult life (column 3). Hint: Jing-mei’s response and her mother’s expectations can usually be found close together in the text. All evidence in column 3 should come from the Lesson 8 close reading excerpt (pp. 142–144). Mother’s Expectations

Jing-mei’s Response

“My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be … You could become instantly famous” (p. 132).

“So maybe I never really gave myself … the most discordant hymns” (p. 138).

“‘Just like you,’ she said. ‘Not the best. Because you not trying.’ She gave a little huff as she let go of the sound dial and sat down on the sofa” (p. 136).

“In the years that followed…” (p. 142) “I didn’t get straight As. … I could only be me” (p. 142).

“You just not trying,’ said my mother. And she was neither angry nor sad. She said it as if to announce a fact that could never be disproved. Take it,’ she said” (p.143).

“My mother slapped me. ‘Who ask you be genius?’ She shouted. ‘Only ask you be your best. For you sake. You think I want you be genius? Hnnh! What for! Who ask you!’” (p. 136)

“‘Why don’t you like me the way I am? I’m not a genius! I can’t play the piano. And even if I could, I wouldn’t go on TV if you paid me a million dollars!’ I cried” (p. 136).

“‘You pick up fast,’ said my mother, as if she knew this was certain. ‘You have natural talent. You could been genius if you want to.’ ‘No I couldn’t’” (p. 143).

“’Only two kinds of daughters,’ she shouted in Chinese. ‘Those who are obedient and those who follow their own mind! Only one kind of daughter can live in this house. Obedient daughter!’” (142)

“‘You want me to be someone that I’m not!’ I sobbed. “I’ll never be the kind of daughter you want me to be!’” (p. 142)

“In the years that followed, I failed her so many times, each time asserting my own will, my right to fall short of expectations” (p. 142).

File: 10.1.3 Lesson 8 Date: 2/3/14 Classroom Use: Starting 2/2014 © 2014 Public Consulting Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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10.1.3 Lesson 8 - UnboundEd

NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum 10.1.3 DRAFT Grade 10 • Module 1 • Unit 3 • Lesson 8 Lesson 8 Introduction In this culminating lesson o...

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